Poland observes 64th death anniv. of General Fieldorf

2017-02-24 22:36 aktualizacja: 2018-09-26, 23:56
Konferencja prasowa dotycząca podpisania porozumienia pomiędzy Muzeum Żołnierzy Wyklętych i Więźniów Politycznych PRL a Wojskowym Biurem Historycznym im. Kazimierza Sosnkowskiego Fot. PAP/Jakub Kamiński
Konferencja prasowa dotycząca podpisania porozumienia pomiędzy Muzeum Żołnierzy Wyklętych i Więźniów Politycznych PRL a Wojskowym Biurem Historycznym im. Kazimierza Sosnkowskiego Fot. PAP/Jakub Kamiński
General August Emil "Nil" Fieldorf deputy commander of the WWII Armia Krajowa (Home Army, AK) resistance force was hanged in a Warsaw prison by Polish communist authorities on February 24.

August Emil Fieldorf, nom-de-guerre "Nil" (1895-1953) was one of the most merited Home Army soldiers and a major activist of the Polish World War Two resistance movement considered by many the largest of its kind and a model of war conspiracy.

At 19, Fieldorf joined Poland's 1st Brigade of the Polish Legions and fought in the 1920 Polish-Bolshevik war. In the inter-war years he was an officer in the regular Polish army, with which he saw combat during Nazi Germany's 1939 invasion of Poland. After Poland fell Fieldorf moved to France, and in 1940 to England.

Upon his return to German-occupied Poland Fieldorf involved himself in underground activity in the Union of Armed Struggle (ZWZ) and later in the Home Army, in which he rose to deputy commander after the failure of the 1944 Warsaw Uprising (October 1944 – January 1945).

After the war Poland's communist authorities sentenced Fieldorf to death on feigned charges of collaborating with the Germans. The then Moscow-sponsored Polish President Boleslaw Bierut declined to pardon Nil. He was hung on February 24 1953 in the infamous Warsaw Mokotow prison. According to IPN his body was localized but not yet idenified as according to NKVD's habit it had been dumped into an unmarked pit along with hundreds of others today being meticulously examined one by one.

Later findings showed that the direct cause for Nil's sentencing and execution was his determination in rejecting proposals of cooperation with communist authorities.

In July 2006, the then President Lech Kaczynski posthumously decorated General Fieldorf with Poland's highest state distinction - the Order of the White Eagle.

Since 2012, the Institute of National Remembrance has conducted a series of exhumations in search of sights of burial of victims of 1945-1956 communist terror at the Warsaw Powazki Military Cemetery's so called Laczka (lit. 'a little meadow'). Among those searched for is also General Fieldorf.

The Enduring Soldiers derived from wartime Home Army (AK) continued their guerrilla war against the communists well into the 1950s and even beginnings of 1960s, among others attacking government prisons and state security offices, as well as detention facilities for political prisoners and concentration camps. Most of the units had been hunted down by agents of the Polish Ministry of Public Security and the Soviet NKVD security agency by the late 1940s or 1950s, the last known enduring soldier was Jozef Franczak, who managed to evade the authorities until as late as 1963, when he was killed in an ambush (PAP)


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